2013-03-21

The sad news of the death of Mindy Baha El Din

Permalink 12:58:10, Categories: WORLD  

Sherif Baha El Din sherif_baha@hotmail.com via yahoogroups.com

11:17 (32 minutes ago)

to undisclosed recipients
My dear wife Mindy passed away on the 18th of March after suffering a brain stroke. For me Mindy was more than a wife, she was my partner, friend and buddy; sharing with me the interest and passion for nature and conservation. She was my greatest fan, as I always called her. Always encouraging and driving me forward.

Mindy was in love with Egypt the deserts, the seas, the birds, and the people. Throughout her life in Egypt she has invested her time in encouraging others and helping young conservationists and nature lovers to get ahead and find opportunities. She was a dynamo and a source of energy that electrified those around her and drove them to take action. Never relenting to a "no" or "impossible" she would find ways around all obstacles with steal determination. I always joked with her that she had a PhD in Egyptian management! She could see through chaos and resolve any complex situation that ten men would be paralysed at, like a knife through butter. Her total honesty and selflessness sometimes ruffled feathers. But there were no BS with Mindy, what you hear from her is the plain truth even if its painful or insulting at times.

Mindy certainly gave a lot and perhaps did not get sufficient acknowledgement, but she never awaited or seeked recognition because she was always busy advocating a cause or developing a project or assisting some one to secure an opportunity.

While I am sad certainly for my personal loss and the pain our two daughters will face, I am in a way equally sad that Egypt lost its greatest fan and nature lost one of its most avid defenders. But her legacy lives in the many many people in far flung parts of Egypt and Middle East that have been affected by Mindy's generosity, encouragement and nourishment. I am sure that Mindy would agree that the best way to commemorate her is to continue her mission with added vigour and determination. Mindy's funeral (ырга) will take place on Thursday, 21st of March 2013 at the Hamdeyya Shazleyya Mosque, located off of Gameat El Dowwal El Arabeyya street in Mohandeseen, Cairo, Egypt between 6:30PM and 9:30PM.

Please also send condolences to Mindy's parents in the USA Gloria and Lyle Rosenzweig
Lyler26 at comcast dot net

Sherif Baha El Din, PhD

Permalink

2011-12-16

UAE Rare kingfisher threatened by demise of mangroves

Permalink 22:12:45, Categories: UAE  

The following is an article from 'The Nation' which can also be found at this link:

http://www.thenational.ae/news/uae-news/environment/rare-kingfisher-threatened-by-demise-of-mangroves

Rare kingfisher threatened by demise of mangroves

While it does not receive the same attention as the Arabian oryx, dugong or marine turtle, the straits that the collared kingfisher finds itself in are no less dire. Put simply, if the mangroves it calls home completely vanish, so does this beautiful bird. Vesela Todorova reports It hides in mangrove forests, weighs less than 100 grams and is considered an essential part of the UAE's natural heritage.
But the blue-and-white collared kingfisher, which does not have the conservation status of marine turtles and Arabian oryx, is endangered.

Kingfishers are found in many regions, from the Red Sea all the way to Australia. But the subspecies kalbaensis can be found nowhere but in Kalba, on the UAE's east coast, and two small sites in Oman.
If the coastal mangrove forests of Kalba, an enclave in Sharjah, are destroyed the birds will be, too.
A new study of Kalba's kingfisher population showed the birds were still in the swamps but their numbers have fallen since 1995, the first time the population was studied.

That first survey was carried out by the late Simon Aspinall, an environmentalist and bird specialist who estimated between 44 and 55 breeding pairs lived in the Kalba mangroves. This spring, a survey of the area carried out by the preservationists Oscar Campbell, Ahmed Al Ali and Neil Tovey estimated the number of pairs was between 26 and 35. The research was supported by a grant from the Emirates Natural History Group. "The true figure, I suspect, is probably close to 35," said Mr Campbell, as he presented the findings last week at a lecture organised by the group. The team had been very conservative in their estimates, he said. Mr Campbell, the chairman of the Emirates Bird Records Committee, had intended to compare notes with Mr Aspinall, who died in October.

Even with adjustments for differences in the methods used, the data shows a decline in Kalba's collared kingfisher population, although the results were not as bad as the team had anticipated, Mr Campbell said.

The reason the numbers of collared kingfishers are declining is that the condition of the mangrove trees supporting it is also declining. Development and the construction of the Corniche has been harming the forest, Mr Campbell said. "Kingfishers don't just need mangroves, they need high-quality mangroves," he said. The birds nest between February and June, using holes and cracks in aged mangroves to build their nests. "Young mangroves simply do not develop like this," Mr Campbell said, pointing to an old, gnarled tree with a hole in its trunk that had been turned into a nest. "Possibly, what is restricting the population is the lack of suitable nest sites."

Steve James, an environmental scientist and ornithologist, agreed: "We are only dealing with two sets of data here so there is a possibility for error. My personal experience from the past 20 years is that the collared kingfisher has declined. I think the figures are fairly accurate and so is the interpretation." In that time, the area of mangrove has decreased by up to 30 per cent due to development, Mr James said.

Mr Campbell estimates that area to be 6 square kilometres. Some mangroves were destroyed to make room for villas and a new road, he said. And the development of the Corniche limits the amount of seawater reaching the trees. Mangroves need to be submerged twice a day. "This is why some of the trees are under stress," Mr Campbell said. This destruction of the mangroves has led to a shortage of nesting spots for the kingfisher. "It is like six of us sharing a one-bedroom flat. You are not likely to have many children, are you?" Mr James asked.

2011-01-27

Crisis in Cyprus: Illegal bird trapping reaches disastrous levels

Permalink 12:58:48, Categories: Cyprus  

Crisis in Cyprus: Illegal bird trapping reaches disastrous levels

http://www.birdlife.org/community/2011/01/crisis-in-cyprus/

Permalink

2011-01-26

Permalink 08:30:03, Categories: Bahrain  

I would like to draw peoples attention to a great funding opportunity for those working in the developing world particularily in areas where development and conservation issues clash. The Shaikh Khalifa Bin Salman Al Khalifa UN-HABITAT Award was established in 2007 by His Royal Highness Shaikh Khalifa in collaboration with UN-HABITAT to promote pro-poor housing and sustainable urban development. So if you work in -- Urban poverty reduction including job creation and local economic development; Development of innovative affordable housing supply systems including slum improvement, slum prevention, access to land, housing finance, real estate management and basic services; Urban environmental management including climate change mitigation and adaptation; Urban governance including de-centralization and the strengthening of local authorities; Gender equality and social inclusion including economic empowerment of women and the youth and their universal access to water, sanitation, health, education and political participation; Effective public-private partnerships in urban development with a focus on poverty reduction, it could be worth the effort of making a submission for the award.

Often solutions to housing, employment and social needs for instance around game reserve and National parks can be found through the empowerment of local people and their involvement in managment issues. Money or a lack is a key issue, thus have a look at the following link http://bahrainexcellence.org/Unhabitat it just could help. Closing date for submission for the 3rd cycle of the award to be presented at the WUF6 in 2012 is June 30th.

Permalink

2011-01-05

Saudi Arabia 'detains' Israeli vulture for spying

Permalink 18:36:08, Categories: Saudi Arabia  

Saudi Arabia 'detains' Israeli vulture for spying

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12120259

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