Post details: Getting hotter as shoreline returns continue

2016-07-18

Getting hotter as shoreline returns continue

Permalink 17:52:05, Categories: Observation by Howard  

It takes no great skill to get decent pictures of Greater Sand Plover at this time of the year, they are both numerous and very prominent on the shore besides being very easy to approach however, this situation will rapidly change as other waders start their return passage as the month progresses. Most will stay to build up body fat before moving on in a southerly direction but a surprising number will stay the duration of the winter. Just which breeding wader populations we have in the Gulf has never been scientifically proven, ringed returns have been minimal not enough even to suggest probabilities.

Greater Sand Plover
Greater Sand Plover

Greater Sand Plover

Greater Sand Plover

Kentish Plover do flock at high tide but otherwise remain paired or in family groups along the shore
Kentish Plover

Socotra Cormorant are still fairly common but birds will soon disappear to their breeding island in Hawar
Socotra Cormorant

Socotra Cormorant

Lesser Crested Tern currently only small numbers on the shore on fishing forays with breeding in full swing on offshore islands currently peaking
Lesser Crested Tern

White-cheeked Tern an opportunistic breeder on the main island now many with fully fledged and mobile chicks
numbers will dramatically increase as they are joined by offshore breeding populations
White-cheeked Tern

White-cheeked Tern

White-cheeked Tern

White-cheeked Tern

White-cheeked Tern

White-cheeked Tern

Curlew Sandpiper now returning in increasing numbers
Curlew Sandpiper

Curlew Sandpiper

Curlew Sandpiper

Curlew now a prominent species with a dramatic increase in numbers this last week
Curlew

Curlew

Curlew

Curlew

Curlew

Curlew

Bar-tailed Godwit small flocks seen expect more to arrive anytime soon
Bar-tailed Godwit

Bar-tailed Godwit

Greenshank starting to make a show along with the slightly more numerous Redshank
Greenshank

Redshank
Redshank

Whimbrel one of those species where some don't migrate but with more being seen migrants could be the reason for the increase
Whimbrel

Whimbrel

Western Reef Heron in the middle of their breeding cycle fishing is the most important part of their daily routine methodology used does vary
Western Reef Heron

Reef Heron and Redshank share the shore
reef heron

Curlew and Redshank
Curlew

Terek Sandpiper first returns just being noted
Terek Sandpiper

As always we have our more common species keeping every neighborhood company
White-cheeked Bulbul
White-cheeked Bulbul

Crested Lark
Crested Lark

and then the oddities like this resident breeding Alexandrine Parakeet
Alexandrine Parakeet

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